Roger Scruton: How to be a Conservative

Bloomsbury, 2014

Front Flap:

ScrutonWhat does it mean to be a conservative in an age so sceptical of conservatism?

How can we live in the presence of our ‘canonized forefathers’ at a time when their cultural, religious and political bequest is so routinely rejected? With soft left-liberalism as the dominant force in Western politics, what can conservatives now contribute to public debate that will not be dismissed as pure nostalgia? In this highly personal and witty book, renowned philosopher Roger Scruton explains how to live as a conservative in spite of the pressures to exist otherwise. Drawing on his own experience as a counter-cultural presence in public life, Scruton argues that while humanity might survive in the absence of the conservative outlook, it certainly won’t flourish.

How to be a Conservative is not only a blueprint for modern conservatism. It is a heartfelt appeal on behalf of old fashioned decencies and values, which are the bedrock of our weakened, but still enduring civilization.

Back Cover:

“One of the best philosophers of our time.”  The Guardian

“Roger Scruton might receive more grudging admiration than any other living thinker.”  The Wall Street Journal

“Scruton is a serious, heavyweight philosopher who has the gift of expressing complex ideas in clear, elegant prose; reading him in full flow affords the simple pleasure of watching an expert do what they do best.”  The Independent

Reviews:

“Roger Scruton is that rarest of things: a first-rate philosopher who actually has a philosophy…one of the few intellectually authoritative voices in modern British conservatism.”  Jesse Norman, Spectator

“Roger Scruton is one of our great men of speculation.”  David Willetts, Standpoint

“A persuasive and poignant little book.”  Ferdinand Mount, The Oldie

“Elegantly written and thought-provoking…I loved this book, especially the way it seems to be aimed as much at the heart as the mind. On both it has a cleansing effect, the equivalent of eating a tart lemon sorbet.”  Nigel Farndale, Country Life

About the Author (Back Flap):

Professor Roger Scruton is a graduate of Jesus College, Cambridge. He has been Professor of Aesthetics at Birkbeck College, London, and University Professor at Boston University. He is currently visiting professor of philosophy at the University of Oxford and Senior Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, Washington DC. He has published a large number of books, including some works of fiction, and has written and composed two operas. He writes regularly for The Times, The Telegraph, The Spectator and was for many years wine critic of The New Statesman.

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Jan Olof Bengtsson D.Phil. (Oxon.)

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