Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category



Sebastian Hennig: Nie zweimal in denselben Fluss

Björn Höcke im Gespräch mit Sebastian Hennig

Manuscriptum, 2018

Kurzbeschreibung:

HöckeDie Berichterstattung zu Björn Höcke besteht überwiegend aus Meinungen über ihn. Äußerungen von ihm sind den Medien eher selten zu entnehmen. Wenn es dann doch geschieht, werden seine Worte nur ausschnittsweise mit skandalisierender Absicht wiedergegeben. Derart wie ein bedrohliches Phänomen analysiert, kommt er als eigenständiger Autor seiner Äußerungen nicht in Betracht. Er dient nur als die harte Kante, an der die gegen ihn ausgesandten Signale zur Resonanz kommen. Keinesfalls soll er als Sender eines eigenen Programms wahrgenommen werden.

Vorliegendes Buch korrigiert das Missverhältnis, indem es Björn Höcke selbst ausführlich zu Wort kommen läßt. Seine Auffassung von den gegenwärtigen Verhältnissen ist dargelegt im Gedankenaustausch mit dem Künstler und Publizisten Sebastian Hennig. Beide Gesprächsteilnehmer gehören dem gleichen Jahrgang an, verlebten jedoch ihre Kindheit und Jugend in getrennten deutschen Teilstaaten. Die während eines Jahres geführten Gespräche spiegeln damit zugleich die Empfindungen einer Generation wider, die unmittelbar nach der deutschen Wiedervereinigung ihr Berufsleben angetreten hat.

Wir erfahren zugleich, welche politischen Ziele Björn Höcke verfolgt und welche Vorstellungen von der Welt er hegt. Darüber hinaus vermittelt das Gespräch einen Eindruck von der Person hinter dem diffamierten Politiker, zeigt auf welchen Erfahrungen und Erlebnissen seine Einsichten gegründet sind.

Über den Autor:

Sebastian Hennig: 1972 in Leipzig geboren, Studium der Malerei und Grafik in Dresden, 1998 Diplom, seit 2003 zudem als Kulturpublizist tätig, u. a. für Islamische ZeitungNeues DeutschlandJunge FreiheitDresdner Neueste NachrichtenDeutschlandradio KulturTumult und Cato, 2015 Buchveröffentlichung Pegida – Spaziergänge über den Horizont, letzte Publikationen: Unterwegs in Dunkeldeutschland (2017) und Kennst Du Theodor Fontane? (2018), lebt als freier Autor und bildender Künstler in Radebeul bei Dresden.

Joakim Andersen: Rising from the Ruins

The Right of the 21st Century

Arktos, 2018

Publisher’s Presentation:

AndersenThe liberal order that defined the latter half of the 20th century is collapsing under the growing weight of its conflicts and contradictions. It threatens to pull European civilization and the peoples who created it with it in its fall. This is no time for liberal reformism; the present moment is a Gordian knot of urgent crises. A significant part of our civilization lies already in ruins, if not always physically. Even so, there is reason for optimism: a number of challengers to the crumbling liberal order have appeared.

This book is both a depiction of the rubbled landscape surrounding us, and an overview of the challengers who are rising from the ruins. Touching on everything from the Italian CasaPound, Alexander Dugin and the Danish Tidehverv, to the New Right, the American Alt-Right and Donald Trump, this book analyzes the key success and risk factors of those men and movements that might lead our civilization and our peoples to create a new historical order.

About the Author:

Joakim Andersen is a Swedish writer and co-founder of the Scandinavian New Right think-tank Motpol. Together with his comrade-in-arms, Daniel Friberg, he is largely responsible for introducing the New Right and the concept of the metapolitical in Sweden. Joakim has been a regular writer at Motpol since 2006 and his articles have been published in a number of other Swedish publications.

About Me

The About page was becoming too long to usefully serve its purpose. I have now removed the summaries of my various positions regarding Spirituality, Arts & Humanities and Europe. The page now contains only the more basic and formal information about my work and publications.

Gamla Sture-Katten, Stockholm

Sturekatten

Instagram

I’m not very social in social media. That doesn’t imply any disrespect for or lack of interest in my social media friends and followers, but only that I find it impossible to regularly post birthday greetings and duly like photos and reports from their private lives, and even the truly important things they share. For I just don’t spend that much time online. I don’t like sitting by the screen too long. For this reason, I simply cannot follow regularly everything in my various feeds.

My virtual socializing, to the limited extent I did it when I first started using social media, therefore inevitably became irregular and indeed unfair, in the sense that I arbitrarily responded to some and happened to miss others of equal importance. To some extent I do follow everyone, however, and I mostly appreciate what I see. I hope everyone will understand why I’m so passive.

On Facebook I now post mainly articles by others, primarily on politics. I used to share much more philosophy, spirituality, art and music links, but the last few years I’ve found it increasingly difficult to prioritize that. Hence my timeline now gives a very limited and onesided view of what I do and what I’m about. Politics is not as important to me as it looks there. On Twitter, I share almost exclusively my own publications. But they’re at least comparatively varied with regard to their content.

On Instagram, however, I share photos. They’re not “social” either, really, and there’s nothing instant about my gramming them. Rather, they are, for the most part, photography as art; they transmit a way of seeing, a world, a truth. I may develop this further in terms of professional photography, and some of the motifs are such that I would have executed as, for instance, oil paintings, had I prioritized painting (I could opt to do that some day). There’s nothing pretentious about this. The reason it may seem somewhat strange is only the Instagram format, and the new possbibility to take these pictures with just a camera phone, without setting aside the time (and space, when travelling) for more advanced technology. In the latter sense, it could, I think, be seen as comparable to not prioritizing the canvas at present, although photography in general was clearly a main reason for the decline – and the modernist transformation – of painting with motifs that could be photographed. And today’s camera phones are more advanced than the early cameras.

It’s true that using only Instagram for my present photography purposes is not a good idea, just like using Facebook only, let alone Twitter, for one’s writing. I do plan to use the photographs elsewhere too – indeed, some of them already appear here, in the architecture category. But for now, most of them can be seen only on Instagram. There are other internet media for photography, like Flickr, which is better, and it’s possible that I’ll start using Flickr instead in the future. But that’s not a difference in kind, only degree. Both Instagram and Flickr have some of the advantages which I argued in the early years of this modest WordPress blog that it had in comparison with print publication, despite the fact that it’s probably difficult, at least for a writer of my kind, to reach a large readership with it, or even the readership that can be expected for my kind of writing, and which I did indeed reach when my work was published by conventional publishers. When I discovered the blog technology, I found it far superior at least as such, in itself, as it were. And in many different ways, not least through the comments sections and the possibility of precise, extensive debate that they made possible. That specific advantage Instagram has too, in fact – whereas Twitter does not.

But I also insisted blogs should be supplemented by print publication. I never read long texts on the screen, for the reason mentioned above. I think it damages our eyes, our minds, our brains, that it causes some kind of dementia (and it seems much in the state of our society after computers took over would confirm that). This is one reason why I don’t write so much, and in fact constantly consider going back to the typewriter and even handwriting. I don’t even use ebooks and e-readers. Long texts that are available only on the internet I always print and bring back to my armchair and cup of tea, where there are also ever-attractive piles of old-fashioned books. The situation could be different with images though. The optimal use of the screen might be for photography (for images of painting, it’s good too, but comparable only to printed art books).

I want to add here that I find it absolutely necessary to express this kind of conservative reservations and indeed general awkwardness with regard to the use of all of these new technical facilities. Not even for substantial contributions in the form of texts or images – or talk or music on YouTube – must one use these new technologies without feeling uncomfortable about what they replace. If we regard technological advancement in a larger, traditionalist perspective, we see the full extent of this, of what is in reality lost.

I find the compulsively felt need of some older people of learning all about computers and the internet absurd. The disruption it causes in their established habits is often a greater loss than the new advantages of internet communication. Had I been around when radio and TV invaded our homes, I would without a doubt have objected to the sudden lifestyle changes their use implied, and then constantly to their overuse, as I do today. Indeed, I would have objected to the overuse of newspapers when they appeared. Even of printing itself when it was invented: it clearly had an adverse effect on memorization and the oral tradition, and in that respect on intelligence. The extent to which we sit – or indeed lie, stand, walk – looking at screens today, often simply for the cheap availability, for distraction, for instant ego gratification, implies an enormous loss, indeed a destruction, of older and often better patterns of life.

Some of my Instagram photos, however, are more ordinary, “social” ones, with glimpses of places, conferences and other events, people. To some, comments of varying length are added; again, discussion is possible, even extensive discussion, although this function is, as far as I can see, rarely used. In fine, on Instagram it’s possible to find major parts of what I wish to communicate, and communicated in a manner that cannot be found elsewhere. Follow me at janolofbengtsson for a visual understanding of what I’m saying in other ways elsewhere. Right now, Instagram is the social medium where I am by far the most active. Although the activity is not particularly social there either, at least I put out my own stuff.

Alfred W. McCoy: In the Shadows of the American Century

The Rise and Decline of US Global Power
McCoyPublisher’s Presentation:
Explores the distinctive instruments of American ascent to global domination and hegemony – including covert intervention, client elites, psychological torture, and surveillance.
In a completely original analysis, prize-winning historian Alfred W. McCoy explores America’s rise as a world Power – from the 1890s through the Cold War – and its bid to extend its hegemony deep into the twenty-first century through a fusion of cyberwar, space warfare, trade pacts, and military alliances. McCoy then analyzes the marquee instruments of US hegemony – covert intervention, client elites, psychological torture, and worldwide surveillance.

Peeling back layers of secrecy, McCoy exposes a military and economic battle for global domination fought in the shadows, largely unknown to those outside the highest rungs of power. Can the United States extend the “American Century” or will China guide the globe for the next hundred years? McCoy devotes his final chapter to these questions, boldly laying out a series of scenarios that could lead to the end of Washington’s world domination by 2030.

Review Quotes:

In the Shadows of the American Century persuasively argues for the inevitable decline of the American empire and the rise of China. Whether or not one is a believer in American power, the case that Alfred McCoy makes – that much of America’s decline is due to its own contradictions and failures – is a sad one. He provides a glimmer of hope that America can ease into the role of a more generous, more collaborative, if less powerful, world player. Let’s hope that Americans will listen to his powerful arguments.”  Viet Thanh Nguyen, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the Sympathizer 

“[A] brilliant and deeply informed must-read for anyone seriously interested in geopolitics, the history of Empire, and the shape of the future.”  New York Journal of Books

“‘What is the character of this American empire?’, Alfred McCoy asks at the outset of this provocative study. His answer not only limns the contours of the American imperium as it evolved during the twentieth century, but explains why its days are quite likely numbered. This is history with profound relevance to events that are unfolding before our eyes.”  Andrew J. Bacevich, author of America’s War for the Greater Middle East: A Military History

“Alfred McCoy offers a meticulous, eye-opening account of the rise, since 1945, and impending  premature demise of the American Century of world domination. As the empire’s political, economic, and military strategies unravel under cover of secrecy, America’s neglected citizens would do well to read this book.”  Ann Jones, author of They Were Soldiers

“Sobering reading for geopolitics mavens and Risk aficionados alike…”  Kirkus

“McCoy’s detailed, panoramic analysis of the past, present, and future of the American empire covers all spheres of activity including not just land, sea, air, space, and cyberspace, but also the netherworld of covert operations – and seasons all of this with some fascinating personal vignettes. His new book, The Shadows of the American Century, joins the essential short list of scrupulous historical and comparative studies of the United States as an awesome, conflicted, technologically innovative, routinely atrocious, and ultimately hubristic imperial power.”  John Dower, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Embracing Defeat, War Without Mercy, and The Violent American Century

“One of our best and most underappreciated historians takes a hard look at the truth of our empire, both its covert activities and the reasons for its impending decline.”  Oliver Stone

“In the Shadows of the American Century is a valuable contribution to geopolitical discourse that draws important lessons from history.”  Foreword Reviews

“McCoy’s latest book, In the Shadow of the American Century: The Rise and Decline of U.S. Global Power, provides an autopsy on a dying empire, which has squandered its moral capital by promoting wide-scale torture and mass surveillance…The end of empire scenarios relayed by McCoy in dark terms could in turn provide positive opportunities for societal change as the necessity for constant war is removed.”  The Progressive

About the Author:

Alfred McCoy holds the Harrington Chair in History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His 2009 book Policing America’s Empire won the Kahin Prize from the Association for Asian Studies. In 2012, Yale University awarded him the Wilbur Cross Medal for work as “one of the world’s leading historians of Southeast Asia and an expert on…international political surveillance.”

10 år

Idag är det 10 år sedan jag startade den här mycket enkla och anspråkslösa WordPress-bloggen.

Peter Phillips: Giants

The Global Power Elite

Seven Stories Press, 2018    Amazon.com

Publisher’s Description:

PPA look at the top 300 most powerful players in world capitalism, who are at the controls of our economic future.

Who holds the purse strings to the majority of the world’s wealth? There is a new global elite at the controls of our economic future, and here former Project Censored director and media monitoring sociologist Peter Phillips unveils for the general reader just who these players are. The book includes such power players as Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Jamie Dimon, and Warren Buffett.

As the number of men with as much wealth as half the world fell from sixty-two to just eight between January 2016 and January 2017, according to Oxfam International, fewer than 200 super-connected asset managers at only 17 asset management firms – each with well over a trillion dollars in assets under management – now represent the financial core of the world’s transnational capitalist class. Members of the global power elite are the management – the facilitators of world capitalism, the firewall protecting the capital investment, growth, and debt collection that keeps the status quo from changing. Each chapter in Giants identifies by name the members of this international club of multi-millionaires, their 17 global financial companies – and including NGOs such as the Group of Thirty and the Trilateral Commission – and their transnational military protectors, so the reader, for the first time anywhere, can identify who constitutes this network of influence, where the wealth is concentrated, how it suppresses social movements, and how it can be redistributed for maximum systemic change.

Review Quotes:

“Adam Smith warned that the ‘masters of mankind’ will pursue their ‘vile maxim: All for ourselves, and nothing for other people.’ There could hardly be a more apt description of the recent era of savage capitalism, straining for new heights under cover of Trump’s antics. Who exactly are the masters? This remarkable inquiry lifts the veil, providing detailed and often shocking revelations about the astonishing concentration of private wealth and corporate power, its institutions and integrated structure – and not least, its threat to civilized and humane existence.”  Noam Chomsky

“Peter Phillips’s book is a timely reminder that as the transnational capitalist class/global power elite changes it is vital that critical researchers keep up with these changes. The reader will find impressive documentation of the institutions and personnel driving capitalist globalization in its destructive and relentless search for growth and profits.”  Leslie Sklair, Emeritus Professor of Sociology, London School of Economics and Political Science

“This innovative inventory of the globally networked power resources of mega-capitalists belongs on the book shelves and computer devices of every journalist and social activist. Thereby they can check global money laundering and business veiling strategies in terms of pervading power and exploitation.”  Peter Ludes, founder of the German Initiative News Enlightenment

“Meet the Giants who really run the world in this timely and important new book, a potent combination of scholarly research and citizen call to arms. Not since C. Wright Mills’s Power Elite has a single book had the potential to transform the way we think about globalization.”  Rob Williams, PhD, University of Vermont

“A tour de force of research and analysis on a frequently ignored but crucial topic affecting humanity’s future: the transnational capitalist class power elite. An extraordinary contribution.”  Dr. Laurence H. Shoup, author of Wall Street’s Think Tank

“The dire challenges facing people and planet are not accidents. They are products of a system in which a relatively small corporate elite use their domination of resources to increase their wealth, to control governments, and to marginalize or destroy those who might impair their power. Sociologist Peter Phillips goes beyond this generalization by identifying, in great detail, the actual people and corporations at the core. This book is a must read for those who believe that system change is necessary, who want to understand which players are most central to the system, and who are prepared to learn how the system can be transformed.”  Marc Pilisuk, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of California, and faculty, Saybrook University

“Peter Phillips carefully uncovers the manipulative ways used by global class elites to keep the world safe for the Superrich – those who try to save capitalism from itself, a foul story we all need to hear and challenge. And Phillips does it splendidly.”  Michael Parenti, PhD, author of The Face of Imperialism

“In this important book, Peter Phillips has advanced progressive thinking about power in several ways. He has expanded sociologist C. Wright Mills’s model of social structure from the national power elite to the transnational capitalist class. He identifies key power-holders within that class, thus highlighting an ethic of individual as well as institutional accountability. And he does so within a consistent human rights framework that is much required in today’s political climate. Giants: The Global Power Elite is a crucial map for desperately needed social change.”  Prof. Robert Hackett, School of Communication, Simon Fraser University

“The unabated global concentration of capital and deepening inequality is putting humanity on the brink of extinction. The financial behemoths running this oppressive and violent economic order have largely operated in the shadows, but Peter Phillips names the names in his latest work.

Giants answers, in great detail, the commonly asked but rarely answered question: who really pulls the strings? This book outlines the handful of individuals who manage the most powerful think tanks, investment firms, and corporate boards, who make society’s decisions at the expense of the planet.

Giants is an essential tool to understand those at the reigns of empire and capitalist hegemony, so we can be empowered to fight for our survival.”  Abby Martin, host of the investigative news program The Empire Files

“Following decades of research on power elites, Peter Phillips’s book Giants exposes the power networks that link the world’s wealthiest individuals and organizations and the ideological justifications that sustain their power. Impeccable original research provides the foundation for an impassioned call to action that reflects Phillips’s abiding commitments to social justice and human rights. This book is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand socioeconomic inequality in the twenty-first century, and it is vital inspiration for those committed to creating a better world.”  Andy Lee Roth, associate director of Project Censored

“If the well-being and effective functioning of democracy is based on serving the peoples’ interests first, we must hold accountable parties who abuse public trust and resources under an impartial application of the rule of law.  Apart from the standard elected and government bureaucrats, Peter Phillips challenges us to re-evaluate the role of powerful financial interests in shaping American life. More than a discussion about an abstract elite, Giants enumerates key players by names, interests, and roles. Valuable material for people who like critical thinking.”  Loan K. Le, PhD, president and CEO of the Institute for Good Government and Inclusion (IGGI)

“If you want to know who is actually ruling the world – read this book.
“If you want to know the organizations they use and the networks that create them – read this book.
“If you want to know ‘what needs to be done’ to stop them from destroying the planet – read this book and then take action.”  David Cobb, 2004 Green Party presidential nominee, co-founder of Cooperation Humboldt

Giants: The Global Power Elite is an admirably accessible outing of the global oligarchy. The graphics work well and the writing is very clear and engaging. Peter Phillips has collected an awesome range of data and presents it really well. I salute his efforts here and hope the book finds many readers.”  William Carroll, professor of sociology, University of Victoria

“Dr. Phillips does an incredible job of detailing the seventeen global financial giants who carry most of the power and control in our world, those who contribute to many of the social problems we are struggling with worldwide, but who often remain hidden from accountability. As a radical sociologist whose work is reminiscent of the great C. Wright Mills, Dr. Phillips names these giants and gives the reader a useful primer for social activism. He details how these groups stay protected by private security firms and the ways in which media spin keeps them looking clean. Speaking truth to power, Dr. Phillips ends his work with an open letter to these global giants, which I proudly signed, inviting them to reimagine a more just society.”  Susan Rahman, PhD

Giants: The Global Power Elite is a must-read for anyone concerned with how the concentration of wealth in the hands of a small number of global political elites affects the well-being of humanity and the ultimate sustainability of life on earth. In the best tradition of political sociology with a strong, data-driven analysis, Peter Phillips demonstrates that a small global power elite has ‘rigged’ a global economy to serve its own interests at the expense of the well-being – even the longevity – of humankind.”  anthropologist Donna Brasset, PhD

“This book is a fearless expose of the ascendancy of a class of global elites and the power they wield around the world. Brilliantly argued and meticulously documented, the pages of this book lay bare the connections between power and wealth, and identify a system that allows a small minority of billionaires to control vast resources of the earth to devastating consequences. Phillips writes with compassion and humanity, and also tells us that unveiling mechanisms of power is a necessary first step in reshaping a global economic system to address the current crises of democracy, equality, and environmental destruction.”  Robin Andersen, professor of Communication and Media Studies, Fordham University

“The global elite, with their associated armies and police forces are, at an accelerating rate, destroying the planet based on their bottom line, which clearly appears to be corporate profit and power at all costs. Indeed, the planet, our children, and grandchildren are facing a very bleak future if these titans of global control continue to have their way. Their policies have already carried us to the brink, putting life as we know it in jeopardy. Giants: The Global Power Elite is a field guide to what these greedy destroyers are up to in the name of profit and global control of planetary resources. Read it and weep, and then act to resist it however you can. As Joe Hill said: Don’t mourn, organize.”  Dennis J. Bernstein, executive producer of the award-winning daily radio news magazine Flashpoints and author of Special Ed: Voices from a Hidden Classroom

“This book, a who’s-who of the global power elite, is a timely and important addition to the work on the Transnational Capitalist Class. Peter Phillips shows that a mere seventeen institutions of financial capital, and the individuals who run them, exert a stunning degree of control over the fate of humanity. Dominated by white males of European descent, this inter-connected global power elite ensures the continued growth of capitalism at the expense of the vast majority. It is a must-read for all scholars and activists committed to economic equality and social justice.”  Deepa Kumar, president of Rutgers AAUP-AFT faculty union, associate professor of media studies at Rutgers University

“We all know that ‘they’ run the world, or much of it; and we know that their only purpose is to make themselves still richer; and that this compulsive enterprise is killing all the rest of us, by spreading poverty, creating endless war, and terminally poisoning the earth.We know how powerful they are, and what it’s doing to us; yet we don’t know exactly who ‘they’ are – information that we very badly need, and that “our free press” has not provided us, nor is it regularly taught in any schools, because the press and schools are largely theirs. And so those of us who want to break their chokehold are indebted (in a liberating way) to Peter Phillips, thanks to whom we finally know the names and stories of those 199 lethal super-managers.

Picking up where C. Wright Mills left off with his invaluable dissection of the “power elite” that used to run America alone, Phillips thoroughly identifies the members of the “transnational capitalist class” that largely runs the world today, through the mammoth instruments of Western military force, an international “intelligence community,” and – not least – ‘our free press.’

It is a daunting explication of the fix we’re in today; and yet Phillips also gives us hope, by pointing up the possibilities for real resistance, and a path toward (real) democracy. For anyone who wants to know precisely where we are today, and why – and who knows that we can and must go somewhere else – Giants is a book to read, and recommend, right now.”  Mark Crispin Miller PhD, Professor Media Studies, New York University

About the Author:

Peter Phillips is a Professor of Political Sociology at Sonoma State University since 1994, former Director of Project Censored 1996 to 2010 and President of Media Freedom Foundation 2003 to 2017. He has been editor or co-editor of fourteen editions of Censored, co-editor with Dennis Loo of Impeach the President: The Case Against Bush and Cheney (2006), editor of two editions of Progressive Guide to Alternative Media and Activism (1999 & 2004). His most recent book is Giants: The Global Power Elite. He was a co-host of the weekly Project Censored show on Pacifica Radio with Mickey Huff from 2010 to 2017, originating from KPFA in Berkeley and airing on forty stations nationwide. He teaches courses in Political Sociology, Sociology of Power, Sociological of Media, Sociology of Conspiracies and Investigative Sociology. He was winner of the Firecracker Alternative Book Award in 1997 for Best Political Book, PEN Censorship Award 2008, Dallas Smythe Award from the Union for Democratic Communications 2009, and the Pillar Human Rights Award from the National Associations of Whistleblowers 2014. He lives in a redwood forest near Bodega, California with his wife Mary Lia.

Roger Eatwell & Matthew Goodwin: National Populism

The Revolt Against Liberal Democracy

Pelican, 2018   Amazon.co.uk

Publisher’s Description:

Eatwell GoodwinA crucial new guide to one of the most urgent political phenomena of our time: the rise of national populism

Across the West, there is a rising tide of people who feel excluded, alienated from mainstream politics, and increasingly hostile towards minorities, immigrants and neo-liberal economics. Many of these voters are turning to national populist movements, which have begun to change the face of Western liberal democracy, from the United States to France, Austria to the UK.

This radical turn, we are told, is a last howl of rage from an aging electorate on the verge of extinction. Their leaders are fascistic and their politics anti-democratic; their existence a side-show to liberal democracy. But this version of events, as Roger Eatwell and Matthew Goodwin show, could not be further from the truth.

Written by two of the foremost experts on fascism and the rise of national populism, this lucid and deeply-researched book is a vital guide to our transformed political landscape. Challenging conventional wisdoms, Eatwell and Goodwin make a compelling case for serious, respectful engagement with the supporters and ideas of national populism – not least because it is a tide that won’t be stemmed anytime soon.

Review Quotes:

“Compelling…Eatwell and Goodwin do a good job of demolishing lazy stereotypes about Trump and Brexit supporters being almost exclusively white and old…Measured and insightful.”  Sunday Telegraph

“A fascinating new study…the authors analyse the long-term demographic and socioeconomic trends shaping our age of upheaval. The attraction of this book lies in its cool, dispassionate tone. The authors intend to explain and inform rather than polemicise”  Jason Cowley, The Sunday Times

“Intelligent, counterintuitive…[ranging] far beyond Brexit and Britain…they put a parochial debate in a much bigger context”  Economist

“Valuable…A finely organised, lucid explanation of the elements presently constituting the most dynamic political movements in Europe and the US.”  John Lloyd, Financial Times)

“A useful corrective…it demolishes the myth that young people aren’t attracted to the populist right.”  Sarah Baxter, The Sunday Times

“A reality check to any clinging to the hope that populism is a passing political squall…Goodwin is one of the few academics to be vindicated by the political trends of the past few years. With a forensic grasp of the detail, Eatwell and Goodwin show how commentators have succumbed to ‘stereotypes that correspond with their outlook’ rather than evidence-based conclusions.”  Asa Bennett, Telegraph

“Convincing, powerful and very definitely worth a read.”  Robert Colvile, Director of CPS Think Tank

“An important and stimulating book…well written, well argued, highly accessible to the lay reader, and mercifully free of political science jargon…it leaves room for optimism for the future of our country.”  Roger Liddle, Progress

“An invaluable guide to the new politics of revolt…Eatwell and Goodwin draw attention to the historic problem that liberalism has faced in accepting democracy. They give us the theoretical framework to understand national populism’s rise…Compelling.”  Jon Holbrook, Spiked

“Informative and often compelling, providing clarity around a number of key debates within political science and political theory…Usefully, they provide copious evidence that rightwing populism has been a long time in the making.”  Will Davies, Guardian

About the Authors:

Roger Eatwell is Emeritus Professor of Politics at the University of Bath. He has published widely on fascism and populism, including Fascism: a History.

Matthew J. Goodwin is Professor of Politics at the University of Kent and a Senior Visiting Fellow at Chatham House. He has published four books, including Paddy Power Political Book of the Year 2015 (for Revolt on the Right: Explaining Support for the Radical Right in Britain). He writes regularly for The Times, Financial Times and New York Times, and has worked with more than 200 organisations on issues relating to European politics. He lives in London.

David C. Korten: When Corporations Rule the World

Berrett Koehler, 3rd ed., 2015 (1995)

Publisher’s Description:

Korten2Our Choice: Democracy or Corporate Rule

A handful of corporations and financial institutions command an ever-greater concentration of economic and political power in an assault against markets, democracy, and life. It’s a “suicide economy,” says David Korten, that destroys the very foundations of its own existence. The bestselling 1995 edition of When Corporations Rule the World helped launch a global resistance against corporate domination. In this twentieth-anniversary edition, Korten shares insights from his personal experience as a participant in the growing movement for a New Economy. A new introduction documents the further concentration of wealth and corporate power since 1995 and explores why our institutions resolutely resist even modest reform. A new conclusion chapter outlines high-leverage opportunities for breakthrough change.

Contents:

A Choice for Life
Prologue: A Personal Journey
Introduction: Capitalism and the Suicide Economy
PART I: COWBOYS IN A SPACESHIP
1. From Hope to Crisis
2. End of the Open Frontier
3. The Growth Illusion
PART II: CONTEST FOR SOVEREIGNTY
4. Rise of Corporate Power in America
5. Assault of the Corporate Libertarians
6. The Decline of Democratic Pluralism
7. Illusions of the Cloud Minders
PART III: CORPORATE COLONIALISM
8. Dreaming of Global Empires
9. Building Elite Consensus
10. Buying Out Democracy
11. Marketing the World
12. Adjusting the Poor
13. Guaranteeing Corporate Rights
PART IV: A ROGUE FINANCIAL SYSTEM
14. The Money Game
15. Predatory Finance
16. Corporate Cannibalism
17. Managed Competition
PART V: NO PLACE FOR PEOPLE
18. Race to the Bottom
19. The End of Inefficiency
20. People with No Place
PART VI: TO RECLAIM OUR POWER
21. The Ecological Revolution
22. Economies Are for Living
23. An Awakened Civil Society
24. Agenda for Democracy
Conclusion: A Living Economy for Living Earth
Epilogue: Our Need for Meaning

Review Quotes:

“This is a ‘must-read’ book–a searing indictment of an unjust international economic order, not by a wild-eyed idealistic left-winger, but by a sober scion of the establishment with impeccable credentials. It left me devastated but also very hopeful. Something can be done to create a more just economic order.”  Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu

“Anyone serious about the systemic crisis we now face ought to read this updated version today. Korten captures the devastating and increasingly threatening dynamics of the corporate-dominated global system and has offered a vibrant, well-written, and important strategy for moving us beyond its destructive economic, social, and ecological logic.”  Gar Alperovitz, author of What Then Must We Do?

“If every corporate leader who believes implicitly that consumerism is the path to happiness (and that rampant development is the road to global prosperity) were to read When Corporations Rule the World with an open mind, that world just might have a chance of becoming a better place for us all.”  Toronto Globe and Mail

About the Author:

David Korten, author and activist, is co-founder and board chair of YES! Magazine, co-founder and co-chair of the New Economy Working Group, president of the Living Economies Forum, an associate fellow of the Institute for Policy Studies, a member of the Club of Rome, and founding board member emeritus of the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies. A 20th anniversary edition of his classic international best seller When Corporations Rule the World will launch in June 2015. His other books include Change the Story, Change the Future: A Living Economy for a Living Earth Agenda for a New Economy: From Phantom Wealth to Real Wealth, The Great Turning: From Empire to Earth Community, and The Post-Corporate World: Life After Capitalism.

David has MBA and Ph.D. degrees from the Stanford Business School, and in his earlier career served as a captain in the US Air Force, a Harvard Business School professor, a Ford Foundation project specialist, and Asia regional adviser on development management to the U.S. Agency for International Development. He lived and worked for 21 years as a development professional in Ethiopia, Nicaragua, Philippines, and Indonesia.

Living Economies Forum (davidkorten.org)


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